Intaglio Printing

  Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669) Self-portrait  - Engraving

Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669) Self-portrait  - Engraving

Students in art have been making prints using the intaglio technique.

Intaglio
is the family of printing and printmaking in which the image is incised or engraved into a surface and the incised line holds the ink. Prints are made when the surface (or plate) is inked and then placed on paper and heavy pressure applied, for example when passed between rollers or placed under a press.

  Albrecht Durer "Knight, Death and the Devil" 1513 - Copperplate Engraving

Albrecht Durer "Knight, Death and the Devil" 1513 - Copperplate Engraving

Traditionally, the surface incised, or cut into is made of metal, for example copper. However, students at TASIS have been experimenting with a malleable plastic material, which is easier to incise, while still giving fine print results.

Many artists have used the this printing technique down through the centuries. Albrecht Durer the master renaissance artist, took the technique to new heights. It remains a popular and very direct technique, and today is often used in the world of graphics for illustrations.

View a gallery of the printmaking in the TASIS classroom below. These prints and other artwork will be on display in the upcoming Arts Festival held on May 22-24 on the TASIS campus.